Posts tagged ‘SX120’

April 22, 2013

Chapel ceiling through the window

This ruined abbey had a chapel tucked back into a section most people were ignoring, but it was very cool to look at. I went around the corner to shoot through this window, and because I didn’t have a tripod to steady my camera I had to balance my little point-and-shoot on the the stone window ledge. That leaves the base of the window in frame, but it also gives you a sense of the scale. If I remember correctly, the window is about four or five feet high, and the ceiling stretches about 20 feet up overhead. I’m probably wrong, but I’m pretty sure I won’t be going back to measure any time soon. I was more interested in the subtle coloring in the stone – the green and the orange – so, I embellished them.
Chapel ceiling through the window
Purchase a print of this photo

February 1, 2013

Cold news

Today was the day, two years ago, that we endured two feet of snow. After digging out for a few hours and reaching the train station just a mile away, I ended up waiting maybe 90 minutes for the next one to arrive. It went so slow that I got off at the first stop and walked home in freezing cold temps. I’ll never forget the hoard of people at the train station complaining about the delayed train. Why complain? The event outweighed the nuisance. I got sick of hearing them moan and went outside to take photos of anything overwhelmed by the storm. The newspaper boxes worked well.

It’s snowing outside my home right now as I write this. I was at the library tonight working on a project (yes, Friday night) and by the time I had finished it was really coming down. That was about two hours ago and it’s still falling. This will be our most significant accumulation in more than a year, I believe.
Cold news
Purchase a print of this photo

January 31, 2013

London windows

I struggled with what to post for today’s image. In the end, these pastel windows in London near Russell Square won me over. I think they’re on Great Russell Street or Museum Street. It doesn’t really matter where they are considering what I did with them. The light was coming from the back, and I knew I was going to thrash this in editing. They actually look quite a bit different than this, but there was something about their shape or structure that I wanted to call attention to. I also wanted the wires to stand out.

The windows reminded me of one of my favorite English bands, Joy Division, in the way that they are astutely British and somehow beautiful and falling apart all at once. I wasn’t sure to like them or wonder about their relevance in the future. There are so many old and awesome buildings in London, but in a way they kind of halt progress. That is to say the new runs into the old and needs to find its way around. It clashes fiercely. I’m not complaining. I quite like them – the old buildings, that is. I’m just not sure if that will be the case for a few generations down the line. At some point everything’s a dinosaur.
London windows
Purchase a print of this photo

January 29, 2013

Weather, tree

It’s as simple as that. The snow came down just enough to illustrate with a camera. The tree stood there holding the light and providing a context for the snow. I got this hand-held from probably 100 feet away at 1/25 of a second & ISO 800. I have pretty steady hands, which is good for this sort of thing. This required almost zero post processing work. No photographer should ever knock point-and-shoots, because they do a pretty good job when you ask them of their best.
Weather, tree
Purchase a print of this photo

January 27, 2013

Ice drip

THE RUNAROUND
I’ve been really busy the past couple of days processing photos for a client and with other rigors of life. I feel like I’ve hardly had time to do any blogging or scope out twitter/Facebook/Google+ for the happenings in the world of photography, etc. I guess that isn’t really the runaround; those things, and the things I’ve been getting done, are fairly sedentary by nature. Word choice, it is everything.

ICE DRIP
We suffered a slushy ice storm this afternoon which got me thinking of this old photo I took two years ago. I shot this icicle probably 75 times before getting it right. It took two hours. There wasn’t a whole lot to it other than getting right underneath, but in standing directly below the end of it the drip falls onto your lens. Then there’s cleanup. During cleanup other drips slide down to the tip and either fall off or freeze (yes, I realize I’m explaining how an icicle forms and you know this, but there’s a point), and this causes changes to composition due to the changing nature of the icicle.

This stelactite of ice was in perfect position with the sky, the background and the sun, so I either had to whack off the end of it and wait for the hook to reform or I had to hope that after others smoothed out the crag still others would reinvent the bump you see in the photo. After deliberating for a while I decided nature should prevail, and so I allowed the ice to decide the photo’s fate. Does that make sense? I didn’t think so, but this is the result… pretty, albeit a bit noisy.
Ice drip
Purchase a print of this photo

January 24, 2013

Shadows through the leaves

SPAM OR NOT?
I got an interesting message on one of my images yesterday about how somebody would like to share my work through their website. I’ve yet to approve the message, as I’m not sure if it’s spam or not, and I’m wondering if anyone else gets these messages from time to time. Usually the spam filters do a good job of getting out the problems, but I’m not sure about this one. I’ve had a few slip through in the past that I was certain were spam, and I’m worrying about setting a precedent on this and opening myself up to a can of worms.

SHADOWS THROUGH THE LEAVES
Autumn used to be my favorite time of year. I liked when school restarted and the air muted from hot and thick to not-yet cool and crisp. The colors were always exciting and being outdoors was fun. It’s changed. Now I see piles of leaves on the way that will require raking, and despite the mild temperatures I sense some pressure of getting outside things done prior to the heavier blanket of cold.

I got sick a few years back with a fever of 106.3 degrees. That was my temp in-hospital after battling the illness for six days. I was told over 107 is when your brain begins to “cook.” I went through massive headaches and chills and sweats. I’ve never been that cold in my life – it was like the cold was coming from inside me. I believe to this day that it affected my body and that I handle the cold not as well as I did in the years prior to getting sick. I’m closer to my former self now, but for a couple of winters I was colder than I’d ever been. The creep of the shadows – the longer ones in fall – and the leaves piling up kind of weighed on me at the time. It was like the cold was coming. It inspired this photo, despite the warm colors from the leaves and the sun.
Shadows through the leaves
Purchase a print of this photo

January 20, 2013

Snow three

It was two years ago, February, I believe. After 21+ inches of snow accumulated over 24 hours it was time to dig out. Knowing I had several hours of shoveling ahead of me just to reach an impassable street felt quite blank. Standing there after the garage door went up in awe of the thigh-high (and in places due to drift waist-high) accumulation, I quickly snapped back to the reality of the triangle of trouble – three things directly impacting each other: car, snow, me. With a more-normal snow event you just get out there, get it done and get on with whatever needs getting done. Not here. This was one of those dawning moments where you realize there’s this false paradigm of your car getting you to where you need to go. Really it is you that takes the car to the destination. The car depends much more on you than you ever do the car. You not only pilot the thing, you give it life by getting it to the road.

That sent me back into my gaze, and I remained there longer looking down at my boots, blinking. I’m the only actor in all of this, and I must act. It was paralyzing. You know how that first scrape of the shovel against the concrete under the snow is so debilitating? It’s even worse when you have to start a foot above. We haven’t experienced much snow in the Chicago area since that day, thankfully. The shoveling took the better part of three hours. I believe it was something like five degrees, but you got such a workout piling up the snow that you barely even noticed.
Snow three
Purchase a print of this photo

January 4, 2013

Jumbled Leeds

I’m not sure why I like this photo. It is a mess. There is really no focal point. I cut the car in half in the lower right corner. There’s still something about it that I like returning to, and I can’t figure out what it is. Maybe it’s that I can’t put my finger on it, and the photo somehow deserves my attention. I find a two-dimensional quality to the image that makes it difficult to tell the buildings apart – where they end, where they begin. In some places it looks like they join together in a surreal sort of way.

Leeds rises up in this jumbled mess, and it’s quite an interesting mix of old and new. I don’t think I’ve ever been to another city like it – how it bundles up in the center and rises fairly abruptly. As you travel out of town in any direction it disappears relatively quickly. There are lots of reds and teal greens in the windows. Gray shows up a bit, too.
Jumbled Leeds
Purchase a print of this photo

January 3, 2013

A walking shadow

I know this doesn’t look right, or maybe it looks like a Photoshop job, but I didn’t touch it. It’s taken straight out of the camera from a couple of years ago. Depending on the lighting on a given summer day you can get really interesting bounce light off of the glass skyscrapers. The guy in the photo happens to be in a shadow, blocked from the setting sun, but there’s so much light hammering down from behind him off the buildings that the ground looks perfectly lit. Outside of that there’s a lot of repeating patterns I just love, so this is one of my rare non-HDR photos.
A walking shadow
Purchase a print of this photo

December 31, 2012

Waiting – Paris Metropolitan

I’m on a train having left work just an hour before the New Year (and Happy New Year, by the way), which means I’ll see the year turn over on this train, but I’m struck with the realization that I haven’t left the country in almost two years. For me, that seems like a long time. For the past six or seven years I’ve traveled quite a bit and seen a lot of interesting places and things to photograph, but now I’m quite busy and not certain this will be the year to venture out again. I hope so. I’m running out of images to use on the blog from anywhere but here. It would seem a trip is in order.

This is an imperfect photo that could use some tweaking, and I may replace it in the future with a refinished version, but I’m thinking of Paris this new years and wondering what it’s like to spend NYE under the Eiffel Tower. Or at least in view of the Eiffel Tower. Yes, just a view might be nice. This train stop is just up the metro line from there. So humor me regarding the nature of the photo, which is one of my earliest HDR efforts, and just think of Paris with me if you’d like.
Waiting - Paris Metropolitan
Purchase a print of this photo

%d bloggers like this: